Category Archives: Medical Negligence

Medical negligence is when a doctor or hospital fails to conform to the medical standards of care and injures a patient as a result.

Parents Sue Florida Hospital After Horrifying Medical Mistake

Two parents have filed a lawsuit for medical malpractice after a horrifying medical mistake left their 19-month-old daughter unable to eat solid foods. The child was rushed to a Florida hospital by her mother after swallowing a small lithium button battery. These batteries generate electrical currents when they come into contact with human tissue. After arriving at the emergency room, the doctor in charge of the child’s treatment underscored the situation. According to the parents, the doctor claimed the daughter was in no danger, and that swallowing the battery was comparable to ingesting a quarter. The doctor ordered an X-ray instead of surgically removing the battery. Ironically, the doctor’s website claims surgeons must remove batteries within two hours to prevent esophageal burns. Surgeons removed the battery after five hours, and the girl suffered severe burns to her esophagus. She can now only eat blended or baby foods. According to the…
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Are Female Doctors Safer Than Their Male Counterparts?

A new JAMA Internal Medicine article has good news for senior citizens receiving treatment from female doctors. They may have better patient outcomes. According to the Harvard doctors responsible for the article, senior citizen patients treated by women had lower mortality rates within 30 days of admission. The data shows 11.07 percent patients treated by female doctors died within 30 days of admission, compared to 11.49 percent of patients treated by male doctors. This accounts for tens of thousands of patients. The differences in patient outcomes persisted for multiple health conditions, including kidney failure, irregular heartbeat, sepsis and pneumonia. Researchers also accounted for the age, income and gender of patients, and severity of illness upon admission. Despite adding these factors in the analysis, the differences in patient outcome remained. This study analyzed 1.5 million hospitalizations occurring between 2011 and 2014. To gather data, researchers reviewed cases involving 18,751 female and…
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Do Teaching Hospitals Have Higher Rates of Central Line Infections?

Improperly used IV lines are responsible for 20 percent of hospital-acquired infections. An estimated 27,000 people fell victim to central line infections in 2015. One in four patients who develop these infections die. Many hospitals have reduced rates of central line infections by 50 percent since 2008. However, a new study released by Consumer Reports shows teaching hospitals have not reduced rates of these infections. The findings are surprising because teaching hospitals have a reputation for being “the best of the best” for receiving treatment. This new report is also surprising because hospitals have financial incentives for preventing central line infections. Under provisions in the Affordable Care Act, hospitals can lose Medicare payments for having high infection rates. Consumer Reports’ study has alarming patient safety implications. Central line infections are too deadly for hospitals to ignore. Can Hospitals Prevent Central Line Infections? Hospitals that did well on the Consumer Reports…
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